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Sinica Podcast

A weekly discussion of current affairs in China with journalists, writers, academics, policy makers, business people and anyone with something compelling to say about the country that's reshaping the world. Hosted by Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn and powered by SupChina.com.
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Now displaying: July, 2016
Jul 28, 2016

This episode, Jeremy and Kaiser head to the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, to speak with Professor Lyle Goldstein, the author of Meeting China Halfway: How to Defuse the Emerging US-China Rivalry. Lyle discusses how the United States could accommodate China’s rise without sacrificing American interests by using “cooperation spirals,” the opposite of an escalation spiral. His ideas are sure to surprise those who believe everyone connected to the U.S. military is a hawk.

Please take a listen and send feedback to sinica@supchina.com, or leave a review on iTunes.

Recommendations:

Jeremy: America’s War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History by Andrew J. Bacevich

China vs. USA: Empires at War (2007) directed by Anthony Dufour, on Youtube and Amazon Prime

Lyle: The Sand Pebbles by Richard McKenna

Kaiser: The Three Body Trilogy by Liu Cixin:

The Three-Body Problem translated by Ken Liu

The Dark Forest translated by Joel Martinsen

Death’s End translated by Ken Liu

Jul 21, 2016

This live recording of Sinica at the Smyth Hotel in New York City on July 13 features the journalists Mary Kay Magistad and Gady Epstein discussing the increasingly complex "frenemyship" of China and the United States. They also talk about the South China Sea, the role of "old China hands," and how the Middle Kingdom is changing the world and being changed by it. The title of the episode is taken from Mary Kay's radio show and podcast, Whose Century Is it?

Mary Kay is a veteran radio journalist who has covered China, North Korea, Southeast Asia, Ethiopia, the Western Sahara, Kashmir and many other places for NPR, PRI and other outlets. Gady has reported on business, current affairs, the internet, and politics in Asia and particularly China since 2002 for the Baltimore Sun, Forbes and The Economist, where he also began covering the media industry after moving back to the U.S. in 2015. They both are regular guests from the podcast's early days.

Jul 14, 2016

This week, Kaiser sits in the guest chair and tells us about his 20-plus years of living in China. He recounts being the front man for the heavy metal band Tang Dynasty and the group's tour stops in China's backwater towns, shares his feelings on moving back to the United States with his family, and discusses the future of the Sinica Podcast. The conversation with Jeremy, Ada Shen and David Moser is one of many 'exit interview' episodes with journalists who are departing China after a long stay. It took place in June 2016, shortly after Kaiser's reentry to the U.S.

Recommendations:

Kaiser: The films of Sam Dunn about heavy metal.

Ada: The End of a Golden Age in China-Taiwan Relations? by Shelley Rigger.

When We Were Kings, a documentary about Muhammad Ali.

Ralph Stanley, bluegrass musician.

David: Wish Lanterns by Alec Ash.

Jeremy: Overcast app for podcast listening on iPhones.

Jul 6, 2016

Rob Schmitz, China correspondent for American Public Media’s Marketplace, has been living in the nation on and off since 1995. He is the author of Street of Eternal Happiness: Big City Dreams Along a Shanghai Road, a book about the people living and working on Changle Lu in Shanghai. You can read the fourth chapter here.

Many of the characters who Rob writes about are waidiren — people who moved to Shanghai from elsewhere and tried to make a living by catering to the tastes of well-off residents of the city. One of them, CK, is an accordion salesman turned sandwich restaurant proprietor. Other people featured in the book are Shanghai natives, such as a couple who fights to keep their old house while facing fire-setting thugs hired by developers trying to remake the neighborhood. And then there are Auntie Fu and ‘Mr Clean,’ veterans of the People’s Liberation Army’s Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, or the bingtuan. They’re spending their pensions and trying to make a fortune selling questionable sexual potency medicines.

We also talk about some people who didn’t make the final edit and why they were left out. They include a paranoid kung fu master and a gay clothing merchant whose sister put the kibosh on his participation in the book.

Recommendations:

Jeremy: Longform Podcast.

Rob: Forthcoming book by Ian Johnson about religion in China (release scheduled for year end).

Kaiser: Flipboard reading app for mobile phone.

 

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